Well, That was Interesting…

topperMiddle

Upcoming Important Dates

Tuesday, August 26 – GMS Open House 6:00 – 7:00 pm
Wednesday, August 27 – 1st Day of school for 6th grade
Thursday, August 28 – 1st Day of school for grades 7 & 8
Friday, August 29 – No School
Monday, September 1 – Labor Day, No School
Wednesday, Thursday & Friday, September 10, 11 & 12 – Tooth Fairies
Monday, September 15 – MLTI Parent Meeting 6:00 pm GMS Auditorium
Tuesday, September 16 – MLTI Parent Meeting 6:00 pm GMS Auditorium
Tuesday, September 16 – Picture Day, Vision & Hearing Screening

The Conversation on Dress Codes

Last week, I mentioned in this space the difficulties of crafting a dress code that was not slanted towards restricting one gender because the other gender might be distracted by the choice of dress of the other. This caused some comments from the Twitter-verse and from some parents of GMS. That is what I had hoped would happen, the beginning of a conversation.

As I said in the post, at the end of the school year,I had a few teachers, male and female, comment on what we needed to do regarding our young girls who wear yoga pants. They used terms such as “disruptive of the teaching process”, ” distracting to the male students” and “it can be uncomfortable for some”, when expressing why I needed to do something.

The way students dress for school has been an issue for generations. Check out this video from the 1950’s to see what “juvenile delinquents” would try to get away with when they went to school and what the “proper” students should wear:

In the early 60’s, during the “British Invasion” to our shores, hair styles became the item of the moment. Schools enacted hair style restrictions to limit the length of the hair boys were able to sport. I can remember on more than one occasion, having the debate with my dad about the length of my hair. He wanted me to comb my hair back, off my forehead, but the style that the Beatles made famous, a bit long and combed across my forehead, was my chosen style.

In schools during this time, administration had rules about how long boys hair could be, using hair over the ears, or on the collar as the rule. I do remember some of my classmates who were suspended from school and strongly advised to visit the barber before returning to school. Interestingly, those that were suspended did visit the barber before returning to school and there were no more incidents of long hair. Hmmmm…

During the late 60’s, hair got longer, the clothing styles changed dramatically and schools were faced with considerably more complex problems with dress codes. In fact, the US Supreme Court had to weigh in on a couple of incidents where students were disciplined for their choice of style of clothing. In Tinker v. DesMoines Board of Education, the court ruled that clothing styles were a form of speech and as such, could not be absolutely restricted. The phrase that the Court used was that “students did not leave their first amendment rights at the school yard door…”, thereby freeing students to express themselves, within certain limits.

Many of the case that went before the courts had to do with the anti-war sentiment that was pervasive during this time.

I guess what I am trying to communicate here is that every generation has had definite issues about how our young people dress while attending school. It seems that we adults have an amnesia about our lives as adolescents. Whether is was Elvis Presley and his sideburns, or the Beatles with their “mop heads”, the hippies and their long hair and scruffy look or, most recently, the baggy, low-riding pants that many of our young men wore showing off their Joe Boxers, school administrators have worked to find ways to get our kids to conform.

We have a wonderful Code of Conduct. The words mean so much more than their dictionary definitions, and they are truly words that need to be put into action. Respect, Responsibility, Courage, Compassion and Honesty are a common thread in the fabric of our school. The meanings are broad enough to encompass a culture of acceptance of others, as well as a positive image of ourselves. Let’s use our Code as our guideline for all that we do at GMS.

A Great Resource for Parents

Occasionally, in this space, I offer different items that I come across in my travels. One of my favorites are all of the offerings from CommonSenseMedia. However, I have been introduced to a teacher, author, mother and Twitter friend who has so many real practical offerings to help all of us help our kids reach more successful lives.

Jessica Lahey is a teacher, a writer and has appeared on radio and TV, so I guess she is famous! More importantly, she is a very practical voice of reason in a time where the voice of reason is noticeably absent. She writes a bi-weekly piece for the New York Times as well as pieces for The Atlantic and Huffington Post Education. She can be followed on Twitter at @jesslahey and her blog at http://comingofageinthemiddle.blogspot.com.

I would suggest that you explore what she has to offer, especially the NY Times pieces called Motherlode. She is truly a breath of fresh air, and, as all parents of middle school aged children know, fresh air is a rare commodity.

Until Next Week…

 

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